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Year Name Location Status
2018 250 Buitengracht 250 Buitengracht, Cape Town Built
2018 Leyden House, Unit 5 Buitensingel St, Cape Town Built
2018 236 Buitengragt Street Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2017 Aquarium Shop V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2015 Disa Primary School Hout Bay In Progress
2015 27 Clovelly Avenue Vredehoek Project
2014 43 Lion Street Bo-Kaap Built
2014 Skukuza Restaurant Kruger National Park Built
2014 Quay 4 V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2014 The Diamond Works Stellenbosch, Franschoek, Windhoek, OR Tambo Airport, Seychelles Built
2014 Lammershoek Farm Darling, West Coast In Progress
2014-2017 De Waterkant De Waterkant, Cape Town Built
2013 Out of India Mumbai International Airport, India Built
2013 Made in SA V&A Waterfront Built
2013 Indaba Lifestyle OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Built
2013 Bambara OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2013 House Scheibe Silverhurst, Cape Town Built
2013 Urban Design Pretoria & Rondebosch In Progress
2013 House Reddy Hall Gauteng In Progress
2012 Murdocks V&A Waterfront Built
2012 Light Fittings Cape Town In Progress
2012 Balustrade Furniture Private Residence, Cape Town Built
2012 Kenya Duty Free Nairobi International Airport, Kenya Project
2011 Out of Africa Kids OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2011 House Rese Gordon's Bay, Western Cape Project
2010 Signal Hill Bo-Kaap Project
2010 Langbaai House Voelklip, Hermanus Built
2010 Voortrekker Road Maitland, Cape Town Project
2010 The Curator Buchanan Square, Salt River, Cape Town Built
2009 African Relish Prince Albert Built
2008 African Origins V&A Waterfront, CTIA, OR Tambo Built
2008 House Sibanda Yserfontein, Western Cape In Progress
2007 House J Simonstown Built
2007 Robben Island Shop Robben Island, Table Bay Project
2006 Tanur Jewellery Sandton City, V&A Waterfront Built
2006 Afro Cafe Salzburg, Austria Built
2006 Afro Coffee Exhibit various Built
2006 Serengeti Tented Camp Wagakuria, Serengeti, Tanzania Built
2005 Canterbury Square Canterbury Street, Cape Town Built
2005 Central Park Dublin, Ireland Project
2004 Ella Street Houses Bo-Kaap Built
2004 111 on 11th Guest House Hermanus Built
2004 Mystic Rose Muizenberg, Cape Town Built
2004 African Eco Store OR Tambo International Airport, Gauteng Built
2004 House Fitzgerald Constantia, Cape Town Built
2003 Leyden House Gardens, Cape Town Built
2003 Breede River Malgas, Breede River, Western Cape In Progress
2003 NGK Synod Gardens, Cape Town Project
2003 Centrepoint Milnerton, Cape Town Demolished
2002 House Ferraz Bantry Bay, Cape Town Built
2002 Protea Hotels Lagos, Nigieria Built
2002 218 Buitengragt Street Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2001 Out Of This World V&A Waterfront Built
2001 Wolpe Balusrade Maitland, Cape Town Built
2001 Clarins Furniture Clarins Headquarters, Cape Town Built
2001 Hurlingham House Hurlingham, Gauteng Built
2001 House Aucamp-Oosthuizen Vredehoek, Cape Town Built
2000 & 2013 The Parks Shops Kruger National Park, Addo Elephant Park, Tsitsikamma National Park Built
2000 Restoration Work Stellenbosch, Western Cape Built
2000 Brunswick Terraces Tamboerskloof, Cape Town Built
2000 Parceval Pharmaceuticals Wellington, Western Cape Built
1999 - 2012 Out Of Africa V&A Waterfront Built
1999 House Rushmere-Maltbie Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1999 (not yet fertilized) Egg Chair Cape Town Project
1999 Wine Ways V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 Pinns Jewellery V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 House Malan Voëlklip, Hermanus Built
1999 Trevoyan Guest House Gardens, Cape Town Built
1999 St. Francis Bay Hotel St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape Project
1997 Glass Table Cape Town Built
1997 House Vith Hout Bay, Cape Town Built
1997 5 Roodehek Street Gardens, Cape Town Built
1996 Spine Staircase Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1996 African Image V&A Waterfont Demolished
1996 45 Leeuwen Street Bo-Kaap Built
1996 Catherine Moore Hyde Park Corner Built
1996 Mummy Bureau Private Residence, Cape Town Built
1994 Whale Seat Cape Town Project
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    The project is a family home in Simonstown. The site lies within a conservation area, which finds its expression in design codes which imply long, low buildings with roofs running parallel to the slope and made out of materials sympathetic to the old town below. The local authority’s aesthetics committee has chosen to interpret these as a recipe for suburban faux Victoriana. 

    The house is specific to its site.  It attempts to represents at all scales the place which it occupies. Its layered massing mirrors that of the site. It consists of a number of small buildings accessed by an alleyway, as in the older parts of Simonstown. The earth is retained by stone walls, as are the road cuttings climbing to the site. Stone walls also line one side of the historic Mile in the town centre. The relationship of cornice to coping is analogous to that of the Flat roofed old buildings in town; the termination of the cornice half way along the side façade is a reflection of the same detail in the police station. The paving and the climbing path find there echo in the cemetery by Roelof Uytenbogaardt. The clipped eaves of the roof are to be found in the Admirals house. The steel stairway is curved and grey like a piece of naval equipment. The barrel of the cannon on the high street points through a slotted steel plate at the slot in the parapet of the tower .The roof of the study is folded up to clear the top of Simonsberg in the view from the sofa. The corner window captures the long curve of the beach. The dining table is located perpendicular to the view so that everyone may enjoy it. 

    All of these incidents are abstracted so as to subtlely enrich the very simple overall idea, which is to make a house between the mountain and the sea. The front of house frames the view over the bay, screening out the suburban context and pulling the horizon right into the house. The wall facing the view is half solid and half void, focussing the bedroom and sitting room inwards, and charging the view by preventing it becoming wallpaper. 

    The house consists of four terraces cut into the scree slope of the Simonsberg and of three blocks and the spaces between themselves and the walls of the excavation. The first space is a forecourt, the second a terrace 4.5 metres wide, the third space is 300 mm wide, and forms a skylight bringing light into the centre of the plan on two levels. The fourth is a wild garden formed between the house and the mountain. 

    The spaces of the house are domesticated through the use of built in furniture and sliding screens in the same way in which we would fit out a n old building for a new use - respecting the difference between what is structural and permanent and what is useful and subject to change of use.

    The house exploits natural ventilation using the stair tower to draw air through the house from all levels. A careful study of the micro-climate was made in order to find a site sheltered from the cape winds with a variety of outdoor spaces ensuring there us always a quiet corner. The house references the old buildings of Simonstown in its colour, the simplicity and scale of the main rooms and its direct use of material and the use of square and golden section proportions, it is accessed up an alleyway like those of the old part of the town. The landscaping has been designed as if the house were a part of the hill, with restia on the flat roofs and fynbos retaining the slopes. 

  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  • House J
  •  

    The project is a family home in Simonstown. The site lies within a conservation area, which finds its expression in design codes which imply long, low buildings with roofs running parallel to the slope and made out of materials sympathetic to the old town below. The local authority’s aesthetics committee has chosen to interpret these as a recipe for suburban faux Victoriana. 

    The house is specific to its site.  It attempts to represents at all scales the place which it occupies. Its layered massing mirrors that of the site. It consists of a number of small buildings accessed by an alleyway, as in the older parts of Simonstown. The earth is retained by stone walls, as are the road cuttings climbing to the site. Stone walls also line one side of the historic Mile in the town centre. The relationship of cornice to coping is analogous to that of the Flat roofed old buildings in town; the termination of the cornice half way along the side façade is a reflection of the same detail in the police station. The paving and the climbing path find there echo in the cemetery by Roelof Uytenbogaardt. The clipped eaves of the roof are to be found in the Admirals house. The steel stairway is curved and grey like a piece of naval equipment. The barrel of the cannon on the high street points through a slotted steel plate at the slot in the parapet of the tower .The roof of the study is folded up to clear the top of Simonsberg in the view from the sofa. The corner window captures the long curve of the beach. The dining table is located perpendicular to the view so that everyone may enjoy it. 

    All of these incidents are abstracted so as to subtlely enrich the very simple overall idea, which is to make a house between the mountain and the sea. The front of house frames the view over the bay, screening out the suburban context and pulling the horizon right into the house. The wall facing the view is half solid and half void, focussing the bedroom and sitting room inwards, and charging the view by preventing it becoming wallpaper. 

    The house consists of four terraces cut into the scree slope of the Simonsberg and of three blocks and the spaces between themselves and the walls of the excavation. The first space is a forecourt, the second a terrace 4.5 metres wide, the third space is 300 mm wide, and forms a skylight bringing light into the centre of the plan on two levels. The fourth is a wild garden formed between the house and the mountain. 

    The spaces of the house are domesticated through the use of built in furniture and sliding screens in the same way in which we would fit out a n old building for a new use - respecting the difference between what is structural and permanent and what is useful and subject to change of use.

    The house exploits natural ventilation using the stair tower to draw air through the house from all levels. A careful study of the micro-climate was made in order to find a site sheltered from the cape winds with a variety of outdoor spaces ensuring there us always a quiet corner. The house references the old buildings of Simonstown in its colour, the simplicity and scale of the main rooms and its direct use of material and the use of square and golden section proportions, it is accessed up an alleyway like those of the old part of the town. The landscaping has been designed as if the house were a part of the hill, with restia on the flat roofs and fynbos retaining the slopes.