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Year Name Location Status
2019 Kirstenbosch Shop Kirstenbosch Gardens, Cape Town Built
2018 Boulders Visitors Centre Project
2018 236 Buitengracht Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2018 JBWF Jeffreys Bay In Progress
2018 CCF Civic centre cape town In Progress
2018 250 Buitengracht 250 Buitengracht, Cape Town Built
2018 Leyden House, Unit 5 Buitensingel St, Cape Town Built
2017 Aquarium shop V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2017 Scatec Solar Offices V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2015 Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi
2015 Disa Primary School Hout Bay In Progress
2015 27 Clovelly Avenue Vredehoek Project
2014-2017 De Waterkant De Waterkant, Cape Town Built
2014 43 Lion Street Bo-Kaap Built
2014 Skukuza Restaurant Kruger National Park Built
2014 Quay 4 V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2014 The Diamond Works Stellenbosch, Franschoek, Windhoek, OR Tambo Airport, Seychelles Built
2014 Lammershoek Farm Darling, West Coast In Progress
2013 Out of India Mumbai International Airport, India Built
2013 Made in SA V&A Waterfront Built
2013 Indaba Lifestyle OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Built
2013 Bambara OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2013 House Scheibe Silverhurst, Cape Town Built
2013 Urban Design Pretoria & Rondebosch In Progress
2013 House Reddy Hall Chartwell North, Gauteng In Progress
2012 Murdocks V&A Waterfront Built
2012 Light Fittings Cape Town In Progress
2012 Balustrade Furniture Private Residence, Cape Town Built
2012 Kenya Duty Free Nairobi International Airport, Kenya Project
2011 Out of Africa Kids OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2011 House Rese Gordon's Bay, Western Cape Project
2010 Signal Hill Bo-Kaap Project
2010 Langbaai House Voelklip, Hermanus Built
2010 Voortrekker Road Maitland, Cape Town Project
2010 The Curator Buchanan Square, Salt River, Cape Town Built
2009 African Relish Prince Albert Built
2008 African Origins V&A Waterfront, CTIA, OR Tambo Built
2008 House Sibanda Yserfontein, Western Cape In Progress
2007 House J Simonstown Built
2007 Robben Island Shop Robben Island, Table Bay Project
2006 Afro Cafe Salzburg, Austria Built
2006 Afro Coffee Exhibit various Built
2006 Serengeti Tented Camp Wagakuria, Serengeti, Tanzania Built
2006, 2012, 2018 Tanur Jewellery Sandton City, V&A Waterfront Built
2005 Canterbury Square Canterbury Street, Cape Town Built
2005 Central Park Dublin, Ireland Project
2004 Ella Street Houses Bo-Kaap Built
2004 111 on 11th Guest House Voelklip, Hermanus Built
2004 Mystic Rose Muizenberg, Cape Town Built
2004 African Eco Store OR Tambo International Airport, Gauteng Built
2004 House Fitzgerald Constantia, Cape Town Built
2003 Leyden House Gardens, Cape Town Built
2003 Breede River Malgas, Breede River, Western Cape In Progress
2003 NGK Synod Gardens, Cape Town Project
2003 Centrepoint Milnerton, Cape Town Demolished
2002 House Ferraz Bantry Bay, Cape Town Built
2002 Protea Hotels Lagos, Nigieria Built
2002 218 Buitengragt Street Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2001 Out Of This World V&A Waterfront Built
2001 Wolpe Balusrade Maitland, Cape Town Built
2001 Clarins Furniture Clarins Headquarters, Cape Town Built
2001 Hurlingham House Hurlingham, Gauteng Built
2001 House Aucamp-Oosthuizen Vredehoek, Cape Town Built
2000 Restoration Work Stellenbosch, Western Cape Built
2000 Brunswick Terraces Tamboerskloof, Cape Town Built
2000 Parceval Pharmaceuticals Wellington, Western Cape Built
2000 & 2013 The Parks Shops Kruger National Park, Addo Elephant Park, Tsitsikamma National Park Built
1999 - present Out Of Africa OR Tambo Int Airport Built
1999 House Rushmere-Maltbie Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1999 (not yet fertilized) Egg Chair Cape Town Project
1999 Wine Ways V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 Pinns Jewellery V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 House Malan Voëlklip, Hermanus Built
1999 Trevoyan Guest House Gardens, Cape Town Built
1999 St. Francis Bay Hotel St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape Project
1997 Glass Table Cape Town Built
1997 House Vith Hout Bay, Cape Town Built
1997 5 Roodehek Street Gardens, Cape Town Built
1996 Fireplace
1996 Spine Staircase Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1996 African Image V&A Waterfont Demolished
1996 45 Leeuwen Street Bo-Kaap Built
1996 Catherine Moore Hyde Park Corner Built
1996 Mummy Bureau Private Residence, Cape Town Built
1994 Whale Seat Cape Town Project
  • Abu Dhabi – Traditional Store, Exterior View Render
  • Abu Dhabi – Contemporary Store, Exterior View Render
  • Abu Dhabi – Contemporary Store, Exterior View Render
  •  

    Contemporary Arabian Souq

     

    Concept and ‘desire’ lines

     

    The store seeks to emulate the qualities of the ancient souqs, in a new, exciting and unashamedly modern way.

     

    Born out of a hexagonal fingerprint, the basic six sided geometric unit is multiplied, enlarged and combined to form the strong shapes that provide specific merchandise areas shapes that define movement and sight-desire lines like a kind non-linear medieval street.

     

    Streets that encourage shortcuts through the store, allowing visual penetration through the store and the traveller bustles through the store in a direct way only to be encouraged off his path by the exiting product on display and entranced by the inherent richness of the souq experiences on the visual, olfactory and tactile sensory levels. 

     

     

     

    Souq Abu Dhabi is modern, slick and captivatingly.  It’s a modern signature and like calligraphy it  attempts to capture the spirit of the modern, innovative Abu Dhabi while still offering an authentic traditional experience for the modern air traveller, leaving them a memorable and lasting modern Abu Dhabi experience’.

     

    The fingerprint of the store is the geometric pattern making of the Arabian mathematicians and astronomers.  Simple repetitive shapes that when combined can result in increasingly complex and exiting forms. The hexagon is a kind of design DNA code that gives rise to wonderfully innovative forms and shapes, which still carry their original properties inherited from the smallest geometric piece. The geometry expands and contracts its scale according to design need.

     

     

     

    The geometric order allows the elements created to have inherent structural stability and a naturally simpler way of manufacture due to their repetitive nature.

     

    The hexagon is the fingerprint of our Souq design concept, utilised in at the smallest scale as fine soft mesh screens and at the largest as movement routes that contain separate spaces or defined zones of merchandise. The larger spaces containing geometries leave their edges open to link to the next space and so doing create larger visual connections thru the store, encouraging deeper visual penetration and maximum exposure thru the entire store.

     

    Separate yet connected throughout, the overall geometric order is always present in the patterns of the ceiling overhead and in the floor tile patterning like a kind of code, a universal ordering devise soft and complex.

     

     

     

    Traditional Arabian Souq

     

    The Middle Eastern souq traditionally comprises pockets of retail intensity lining streets, abutting city walls and taking over any available corner of the urban fabric

     

    The souq’s stores, although identifiable and separate, all have a similarity that unifies and connect the overall bustling souq experience.  Traditionally the trading stores moved around and were packed up at night and out again the next day, sometimes moving from town to town, so by their nature were made of easily dis-assembled and re-assembled components.

     

    Modern shopping centres generally don’t do justice to the inherent richness of the souq experiences on the visual, olfactory and tactile sensory levels.  Al Souq al Arabi attempts to capture this experience for the modern air traveller, giving them a memorable and lasting ‘last Arabian experience’.

     

    Geometry was born in Arabia and matured with the Arabian mathematicians and astronomers.  Geometry mimics the building blocks of the universe, a tiny elemental thing that, thru repetition and manipulation, can give rise to an infinite number of created possibilities which still carry their original geometric fractal properties.

     

    In reverse order, geometrically complex elements can be revers engineered and reduced down to their simple geometric building blocks.  These geometric building blocks by their nature have inherent structural stability, ease of manufacture and repetitive behaviour.

     

    The hexagon is the fingerprint of our Souq design concept.  The geometry expands and contracts its scale according to design need and is used to generate elements from the smallest scale, such as fine, soft metal mesh screens, and at the largest scale the geometry forms larger, separately defined pod spaces or merchandise areas.

     

    The larger pods are joined into a kind of chain link corridor diagonally through the store.  Edges of the pods are left open in places to balance the thrust through the store and to encourage visual connections thru the store for deeper shopper penetration and exposure thru the entire store.

     

2015

Abu Dhabi

  • Abu Dhabi – Traditional Store, Ground Floor Plan
  • Abu Dhabi – Traditional Store, Ceiling Plan
  • Abu Dhabi – Contemporary Store, Ground Floor Plan
  • Abu Dhabi – Contemporary Store, Ceiling Plan
  •  

    Contemporary Arabian Souq

     

    Concept and ‘desire’ lines

     

    The store seeks to emulate the qualities of the ancient souqs, in a new, exciting and unashamedly modern way.

     

    Born out of a hexagonal fingerprint, the basic six sided geometric unit is multiplied, enlarged and combined to form the strong shapes that provide specific merchandise areas shapes that define movement and sight-desire lines like a kind non-linear medieval street.

     

    Streets that encourage shortcuts through the store, allowing visual penetration through the store and the traveller bustles through the store in a direct way only to be encouraged off his path by the exiting product on display and entranced by the inherent richness of the souq experiences on the visual, olfactory and tactile sensory levels. 

     

     

     

    Souq Abu Dhabi is modern, slick and captivatingly.  It’s a modern signature and like calligraphy it  attempts to capture the spirit of the modern, innovative Abu Dhabi while still offering an authentic traditional experience for the modern air traveller, leaving them a memorable and lasting modern Abu Dhabi experience’.

     

    The fingerprint of the store is the geometric pattern making of the Arabian mathematicians and astronomers.  Simple repetitive shapes that when combined can result in increasingly complex and exiting forms. The hexagon is a kind of design DNA code that gives rise to wonderfully innovative forms and shapes, which still carry their original properties inherited from the smallest geometric piece. The geometry expands and contracts its scale according to design need.

     

     

     

    The geometric order allows the elements created to have inherent structural stability and a naturally simpler way of manufacture due to their repetitive nature.

     

    The hexagon is the fingerprint of our Souq design concept, utilised in at the smallest scale as fine soft mesh screens and at the largest as movement routes that contain separate spaces or defined zones of merchandise. The larger spaces containing geometries leave their edges open to link to the next space and so doing create larger visual connections thru the store, encouraging deeper visual penetration and maximum exposure thru the entire store.

     

    Separate yet connected throughout, the overall geometric order is always present in the patterns of the ceiling overhead and in the floor tile patterning like a kind of code, a universal ordering devise soft and complex.

     

     

     

    Traditional Arabian Souq

     

    The Middle Eastern souq traditionally comprises pockets of retail intensity lining streets, abutting city walls and taking over any available corner of the urban fabric

     

    The souq’s stores, although identifiable and separate, all have a similarity that unifies and connect the overall bustling souq experience.  Traditionally the trading stores moved around and were packed up at night and out again the next day, sometimes moving from town to town, so by their nature were made of easily dis-assembled and re-assembled components.

     

    Modern shopping centres generally don’t do justice to the inherent richness of the souq experiences on the visual, olfactory and tactile sensory levels.  Al Souq al Arabi attempts to capture this experience for the modern air traveller, giving them a memorable and lasting ‘last Arabian experience’.

     

    Geometry was born in Arabia and matured with the Arabian mathematicians and astronomers.  Geometry mimics the building blocks of the universe, a tiny elemental thing that, thru repetition and manipulation, can give rise to an infinite number of created possibilities which still carry their original geometric fractal properties.

     

    In reverse order, geometrically complex elements can be revers engineered and reduced down to their simple geometric building blocks.  These geometric building blocks by their nature have inherent structural stability, ease of manufacture and repetitive behaviour.

     

    The hexagon is the fingerprint of our Souq design concept.  The geometry expands and contracts its scale according to design need and is used to generate elements from the smallest scale, such as fine, soft metal mesh screens, and at the largest scale the geometry forms larger, separately defined pod spaces or merchandise areas.

     

    The larger pods are joined into a kind of chain link corridor diagonally through the store.  Edges of the pods are left open in places to balance the thrust through the store and to encourage visual connections thru the store for deeper shopper penetration and exposure thru the entire store.

     

2015

Abu Dhabi