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Year Name Location Status
2018 250 Buitengracht 250 Buitengracht, Cape Town Built
2018 Leyden House, Unit 5 Buitensingel St, Cape Town Built
2018 236 Buitengragt Street Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2017 Aquarium Shop V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2015 Disa Primary School Hout Bay In Progress
2015 27 Clovelly Avenue Vredehoek Project
2014 43 Lion Street Bo-Kaap Built
2014 Skukuza Restaurant Kruger National Park Built
2014 Quay 4 V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Built
2014 The Diamond Works Stellenbosch, Franschoek, Windhoek, OR Tambo Airport, Seychelles Built
2014 Lammershoek Farm Darling, West Coast In Progress
2014-2017 De Waterkant De Waterkant, Cape Town Built
2013 Out of India Mumbai International Airport, India Built
2013 Made in SA V&A Waterfront Built
2013 Indaba Lifestyle OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Built
2013 Bambara OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2013 House Scheibe Silverhurst, Cape Town Built
2013 Urban Design Pretoria & Rondebosch In Progress
2013 House Reddy Hall Gauteng In Progress
2012 Murdocks V&A Waterfront Built
2012 Light Fittings Cape Town In Progress
2012 Balustrade Furniture Private Residence, Cape Town Built
2012 Kenya Duty Free Nairobi International Airport, Kenya Project
2011 Out of Africa Kids OR Tambo Airport, Gauteng Project
2011 House Rese Gordon's Bay, Western Cape Project
2010 Signal Hill Bo-Kaap Project
2010 Langbaai House Voelklip, Hermanus Built
2010 Voortrekker Road Maitland, Cape Town Project
2010 The Curator Buchanan Square, Salt River, Cape Town Built
2009 African Relish Prince Albert Built
2008 African Origins V&A Waterfront, CTIA, OR Tambo Built
2008 House Sibanda Yserfontein, Western Cape In Progress
2007 House J Simonstown Built
2007 Robben Island Shop Robben Island, Table Bay Project
2006 Tanur Jewellery Sandton City, V&A Waterfront Built
2006 Afro Cafe Salzburg, Austria Built
2006 Afro Coffee Exhibit various Built
2006 Serengeti Tented Camp Wagakuria, Serengeti, Tanzania Built
2005 Canterbury Square Canterbury Street, Cape Town Built
2005 Central Park Dublin, Ireland Project
2004 Ella Street Houses Bo-Kaap Built
2004 111 on 11th Guest House Hermanus Built
2004 Mystic Rose Muizenberg, Cape Town Built
2004 African Eco Store OR Tambo International Airport, Gauteng Built
2004 House Fitzgerald Constantia, Cape Town Built
2003 Leyden House Gardens, Cape Town Built
2003 Breede River Malgas, Breede River, Western Cape In Progress
2003 NGK Synod Gardens, Cape Town Project
2003 Centrepoint Milnerton, Cape Town Demolished
2002 House Ferraz Bantry Bay, Cape Town Built
2002 Protea Hotels Lagos, Nigieria Built
2002 218 Buitengragt Street Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
2001 Out Of This World V&A Waterfront Built
2001 Wolpe Balusrade Maitland, Cape Town Built
2001 Clarins Furniture Clarins Headquarters, Cape Town Built
2001 Hurlingham House Hurlingham, Gauteng Built
2001 House Aucamp-Oosthuizen Vredehoek, Cape Town Built
2000 & 2013 The Parks Shops Kruger National Park, Addo Elephant Park, Tsitsikamma National Park Built
2000 Restoration Work Stellenbosch, Western Cape Built
2000 Brunswick Terraces Tamboerskloof, Cape Town Built
2000 Parceval Pharmaceuticals Wellington, Western Cape Built
1999 - 2012 Out Of Africa V&A Waterfront Built
1999 House Rushmere-Maltbie Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1999 (not yet fertilized) Egg Chair Cape Town Project
1999 Wine Ways V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 Pinns Jewellery V&A Waterfront Demolished
1999 House Malan Voëlklip, Hermanus Built
1999 Trevoyan Guest House Gardens, Cape Town Built
1999 St. Francis Bay Hotel St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape Project
1997 Glass Table Cape Town Built
1997 House Vith Hout Bay, Cape Town Built
1997 5 Roodehek Street Gardens, Cape Town Built
1996 Spine Staircase Bo-Kaap, Cape Town Built
1996 African Image V&A Waterfont Demolished
1996 45 Leeuwen Street Bo-Kaap Built
1996 Catherine Moore Hyde Park Corner Built
1996 Mummy Bureau Private Residence, Cape Town Built
1994 Whale Seat Cape Town Project
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  • 43 Lion Street
  •  

    When visiting this house, one is struck by a beautiful ambiguity: it is both a Victorian row house and a machine for living in. This dual representation is engendered by the design of the facade as a habitable space, a traditional stoep rendered as a transparent black steel frame accommodating sliding gates, rolling cycles, opening doors, growing plants…

     

    The house is in fact a reworking of a 70m2 single storey Victorian cottage with an unusable basement beneath. This has been reconfigured into 170m2 of interior space with habitable balcony space to front and rear on all levels and with a roof terrace tucked behind the profile of the pitched roof.

     

    Even before one enters the front door, the sky is visible through the storey-height fanlight. Crossing the threshold, an open tread between walls leads up to the open-plan living area with the kitchen area opening out through to the stoep onto the street, the lounge towards the back reveals what is hidden from the street - a panorama of the city in its bowl, the mountains of Stellenbosch beyond.

     

    In the centre of the house space sits the dining table, with a ceramic stove off to one side and a glowing glass prism to the other. A light scoop against the wall reveals itself to be a bench on the roof terrace above. This room in the sky is reached via a delicate steel stair pinned lightly to the party wall and hanging from its handrail. It is a space in which to experience what Le Corbusier understood to be life’s essential pleasures - sol, espace et verdure; sun space and greenery.

     

    Light falls from the roof here through the glowing glass box on the living level, punches through the ground floor bringing light and air to the bathrooms located at the centre of this and the lowest level. Leaving the house, one climbs up a solid, earthbound stair which brings light from the back of the house all the way to the front. Looking back from the street, one can glimpse through the punched metal screens of the kitchen window back up to the roof terrace, perhaps someone silhouetted against the sky.

     

    Everything in the house is what it is, and does what it needs to do, there is no styling, no over-articulation, no disguise. It is the necessary and sufficient statement of its place, its construction, its utility and of the pleasures and values shared by its owners and its architect.

     

    As such it is not just a particular house, but also a model of what a house should be.

     

    Text by Kevin Fellingham.

43 Lion Street

  • 43 Lion Street - Lower Ground Floor Plan
  • 43 Lion Street - Ground Floor Plan
  • 43 Lion Street - First Floor Plan
  • 43 Lion Street - Site & Roof Plan
  • 43 Lion Street - North West Elevation
  • 43 Lion Street - South East Elevation
  • 43 Lion Street - Section 1
  • 43 Lion Street - Section 2
  • 43 Lion Street - Section 3
  •  

    When visiting this house, one is struck by a beautiful ambiguity: it is both a Victorian row house and a machine for living in. This dual representation is engendered by the design of the facade as a habitable space, a traditional stoep rendered as a transparent black steel frame accommodating sliding gates, rolling cycles, opening doors, growing plants…

     

    The house is in fact a reworking of a 70m2 single storey Victorian cottage with an unusable basement beneath. This has been reconfigured into 170m2 of interior space with habitable balcony space to front and rear on all levels and with a roof terrace tucked behind the profile of the pitched roof.

     

    Even before one enters the front door, the sky is visible through the storey-height fanlight. Crossing the threshold, an open tread between walls leads up to the open-plan living area with the kitchen area opening out through to the stoep onto the street, the lounge towards the back reveals what is hidden from the street - a panorama of the city in its bowl, the mountains of Stellenbosch beyond.

     

    In the centre of the house space sits the dining table, with a ceramic stove off to one side and a glowing glass prism to the other. A light scoop against the wall reveals itself to be a bench on the roof terrace above. This room in the sky is reached via a delicate steel stair pinned lightly to the party wall and hanging from its handrail. It is a space in which to experience what Le Corbusier understood to be life’s essential pleasures - sol, espace et verdure; sun space and greenery.

     

    Light falls from the roof here through the glowing glass box on the living level, punches through the ground floor bringing light and air to the bathrooms located at the centre of this and the lowest level. Leaving the house, one climbs up a solid, earthbound stair which brings light from the back of the house all the way to the front. Looking back from the street, one can glimpse through the punched metal screens of the kitchen window back up to the roof terrace, perhaps someone silhouetted against the sky.

     

    Everything in the house is what it is, and does what it needs to do, there is no styling, no over-articulation, no disguise. It is the necessary and sufficient statement of its place, its construction, its utility and of the pleasures and values shared by its owners and its architect.

     

    As such it is not just a particular house, but also a model of what a house should be.

     

    Text by Kevin Fellingham.

43 Lion Street